Category Archives: Reviews

Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018)

As robust and practical an action movie as there ever was. Fallout takes a second to ease into once you realise that, oh wait, you need to actually remember what happened in the last instalment this time around, but it soon makes … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews, Rewatch | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cam (2018)

Even wrapped up in a potentially problematic genre framework, Cam avoids the pitfalls that weaker films about this subject matter would fall into and succeeds as a thoroughly entertaining and effective invasion shocker. Madeline Brewer’s performance is great, managing to exude the extreme … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Tideland (2005)

The deranged lovechild of Lewis Carroll, Gummo, Nekromantik and Malick nobody asked for. Endlessly icky and puzzling but one of those hard Gilliam tonal swings you wouldn’t want to be without. The mix of innocence and perversion soon becomes tiresome but there are … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews, Rewatch | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Exorcist III (1990)

This is genuinely creepy in parts and works better as a companion to Blatty’s own The Ninth Configuration rather than a second sequel to The Exorcist, but it’s not a bad one of those either. George C. Scott delivers an angry, blustering performance … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn (2018)

It’s definitely fun to see Jim “Greasy Strangler” Hosking graduate into a bigger budget tier, allowing him to cast a roster of impressive top-level Hollywood comedy players while still retaining his distinctive brand of cinematic what-the-fuckery. The relentlessly forced weirdness … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blindspotting (2018)

For better or worse Blindspotting is a film totally energised by the pulse of unrest in today’s America. White cops shooting unarmed black men, gentrification, racial tensions at breaking point, shifting social attitudes and the air of political claustrophobia are all threaded … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

In Fabric (2019)

The first half of this is Peter Strickland at his best. An aesthetic to die for, dizzyingly controlled, deliciously odd, deranged humour. Phrases like “transformation sphere”, “artery red” all pop out at you. Amazing to see Secrets & Lies‘ Marianne Jean-Baptiste … Continue reading

Posted in Reviews | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment